Sunday, November 2, 2014

15-Minute Turtleneck Cape DIY Tutorial

This tutorial is perfect for beginner sew-ists.  It consists of 2 simple shapes sewn together with 2 seams.

15-Minute Turtleneck Cape DIY Tutorial

Difficulty: Very Easy

Time: ~15 minutes

Materials:
  • 1.5 yards Fleece or heavy knit fabric
    • Bonus: Fleece does not fray so you may opt to leave the edges raw / unsewn
 Steps:

1.) First, fold a 40 x 40" square in 1/2 twice so that the resulting square you see is 20 x 20"

2.  From the folded corner, use your measuring tape to measure out 20" all along the edge of the fabric and mark (I use regular chalk, but there are also marking tools in the notions section of your fabric store) as you go to form an arc.  This arc will result in the circle you'll use for your cape.

You can see my blue chalk lines in the above photo from the arc markings.

3.  Cut along your arc lines.

4.  For a typical turtleneck, measure out your radius at the folded tip as 2.5" in the same manner as you did for the cape edges and then cut.

5.  Your turtleneck piece is a 14 x 17" rectangle.  Make sure your 17" edge is the stretchy side of the fabric so that you may easily slip your cape on and off.

If you're using the same type of fleece I am, you'll find that the selvedge edge does not stretch.  Use the selvedge edge for the 14" length.

6.  Fold in half with the right sides together and sew down (use a twin needle or serger for stretch) the open edges.  

7.  Turn your cape pieces inside out and place the turtleneck portion inside your cape.  Line up the edges and sew (twin needle or serger for stretch again - a regular straight stitch would snap).

If you're using fleece, you can leave your edges unsewn since it won't fray.

(You can choose to sew the edges if you'd prefer though!  Just fold inwards and stitch.)

You're finished!

Alternately, feel free to vary the measurements to your preferences.  Here are some ideas:

  • Cowl Neck - cut a larger neck opening and a correspondingly longer rectangle (on the stretchy side) for the cowl
  • Full-sized Long Cape - Cut your circle as 30" (should essentially by your neck to wrist length + 2.5") instead of 20"
  • Capelet - Make your circle 15" (should essentially be your neck to elbow length + 2.5") instead of 20"
Happy sewing!

31 comments:

  1. Looks super warm and cozy!!!! Great combo of 2 fall favorites.

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  2. Just made this. We'll just the Cape part. I left the cowl off. Only followed the first 4 steps. Mainly because I had some extra fleece and was looking for a quick something to keep me warm. So so simple and cute and it took me maybe one minute to cut this out. I don't know why I didn't think to do this a long time ago. I can't stop being excited about this.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for taking the time to let me know you liked the cape! It's fantastic to hear that the tut worked well for you!

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  3. Looks so comfy. Thank you for the tutorial.

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  4. Can't wait to make one fall is coming very soon!!!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for commenting - I'm looking forward to making fall / winter items too! I have so many plaids I'd like to use :)

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    2. I was planning on a zig zag stitch' do you think that would work?

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  5. Oh, I really wanted to do this beginner project but you need a twin needle or a serger? That suddenly sounds a lot more complicated to me. Any other solution with a regular machine/needle - please? Thank you!

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    Replies
    1. I found a way with a regular sewing machine and needle: I took a less stretching material and did a 14x23 inch neck piece. Seems to have worked out, we'll see if it holds through time!

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    2. Hi Elise! So sorry for the delayed reply, but I'm glad you found a method!

      Another way with a regular machine and needle is to either use a zig zag stitch or sew your fabric while pulling it taut so that the threads won't break when the fabric is stretched.

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  6. We would like to subscribe to your email newsletters, please.
    laurie_wallick@yahoo.com. Also, do you have a Facebook page?

    Thanks,

    Lorili Design, Inc.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Laurie and thanks for your interest! I don't have an email newsletter nor an active Facebook page, but you can find me on Instagram with the name "SewEatRepeat" :)

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  7. What do you recommend for the opening measurement for a cowl turtle neck? I made the tutorial based on your measurements above and it came out so small, almost child size on me. The 2.5 inches was too small and I don't want to cut it too big and not have it look right.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Allyson! One option is to look at a turtleneck you already have and measure the neck opening. Another option is to make minute trims along the circumference and try on until it feels comfortable. Hope that helps!

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  8. i stumbled upon this while browsing the other night and now i have 5 of these in my closet. i am obsessed! thank you so much for posting. i am petite as well, and so it was so nice to see it on someone else petite and see how cute it was before starting!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Amy - thanks so much for taking the time to leave your kind comment! I'm so glad you like this!

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  9. Just finished making one for my boss as Christmas gift ,I used veltex fabric ,its looks and feel awesome. She love furry stuffs lol.
    Christiane.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Christiane - your fabric choice sounds wonderful! Thanks for sharing :)

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  10. do you have any tips for sewists without a walking foot? :)

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    Replies
    1. Hi Lisa! You shouldn't need a walking foot for this project as the layers (even with fleece) are not thick enough to require it. Happy sewing!

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  11. Hi! This looks so adorable. I just have a question about step 6 - when you say sew down the open edges, you don't mean all the way round, right? Do you just mean the longest edge? And which edges of that piece am I matching to the neck hole? Really appreciate your help! thanks, Amanda

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    Replies
    1. Hi Amanda - thank you! You are correct - step 6 is just sewing down the longest edge. You can use either of the short edges (they should be identical) to match to the neck hole. Hope that helps! Let me know if you have any other questions :)

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  12. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  13. I am a complete newbie to sewing and I am having some trouble connecting the turtleneck to the cape part. Could you give me maybe a more detailed description? Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Genie! Essentially, you'll align the 2 openings together with the right sides of the fabric facing each other. Imagine placing your turtleneck tube inside your cape cone and sewing along the neck. Does that help?

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  14. Sometimes I see 2 cape cutouts together to make it warmer, or add a wide piece around the circumference that compliments the primary color and fabric.
    Makes it warmer and adds a little extra flair. ;)

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    Replies
    1. That's a fantastic idea - thanks for sharing!

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  15. Hi...I am a plus size lady and would like to make it mid calf or so for length. Would you be so kind to approximate yardage for me? I am also tinking of adding some cuffs so I can have some kind of arm definition.


    Thanks in advance.

    Sue

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    Replies
    1. Hi Sue! For mid-calf, I'd measure from the nape of your neck down to mid-calf - this is about 39" for me and so rather than folding fabric into quarters like the above, you'll have to fold 2 pieces of fabric in half and cut semi-circles. You'll then need to connect the semi-circles together into a full circle. I'd recommend getting at least 3 yards of fabric depending how tall you are. Hope this helps!

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  16. Forgot to check notify me.....

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  17. Hi I really appreciate your all efforts which is specially for the DIY tutorials.
    well done.


    DIY tutorials

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I'm the type of gal who gets giddy when I receive mail - it's no different with comments! I really appreciate the feedback and love hearing from you :)

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